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Post The few but important 2016 redshirts

Wednesday August 16, 2017

Kirby Smart had fewer than two months to salvage and fill out his first signing class in 2016. It wasn’t the largest class, and it didn’t receive the accolades of his first full class in 2017, but last season’s newcomers still had a considerable impact on the 2016 team. How big of an impact? 16 of the 21 signees saw playing time in 2016. About 10 of them became what I’d consider “regulars”: either outright starters or frequently-used reserves like David Marshall and Brian Herrien. Others saw occasional action, had their playing time limited by injury, or contributed on special teams.

One signee, Chad Clay, was dismissed from the program. That leaves just four players who enter 2017 as redshirt freshmen.

  • OL Chris Barnes
  • OL Ben Cleveland
  • OL Solomon Kindley
  • DE/OLB Chauncey Manac

It’s interesting that three of the redshirts were offensive linemen. Even with the state of the offensive line in 2016, the coaches still balked at playing many true freshmen. It’s the toughest position to play as a freshman, and a true freshman on the offensive line is often a last resort. That said, a couple of true freshmen in the 2017 class, especially Isaiah Wilson and Andrew Thomas, are expected to compete for significant playing time – if not starting roles. They’ll be competing against these three redshirt freshmen as well as some more veteran prospects. With Gaillard and Wynn returning, several positions are up for grabs.

Kindley actually saw playing time as a true freshman. He was in for a single snap against Missouri. The coaches considered Kindley one of the team’s top eight linemen and planned to play him more as the season went on, but injuries affected that plan, and he never saw the field again. Georgia appealed to the NCAA to salvage his redshirt, and that appeal was granted earlier this year. Kindley will still have four years of eligibility, and he’s likely to step in for Gaillard at right guard if Gaillard starts at center. Cleveland, a former 5* prospect, has looked the part of a dominant lineman since high school, but he’s a good example of how even the bluest of the blue chips can have an adjustment moving to the college game. He’s a contender at either guard or right tackle, but it feels like a pivotal year for his development.

In many years Chauncey Manac might have played as a true freshmen, but the need at his position in 2016 didn’t justify burning the redshirt. He could be an important piece in Georgia’s search for an improved pass rush. Manac’s combination of size and speed give the coaches some flexibility, and Manac spent the spring working at both outside linebacker and defensive end.

Smart said if the Bulldogs often played against offenses such as Georgia’s, LSU’s and Arkansas’, which are more traditional, pro-style offenses, Manac would exclusively be an outside linebacker. However, with the amount of spread teams Georgia faces, Manac can be utilized on the defensive line due to his speed and size.

A 3-4 defensive end with some speed whose size isn’t a liability is a nice ace in the hole for Kirby Smart and his defensive staff.

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