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Post Georgia’s entry into the Formula 1 division of the SEC

Monday May 17, 2010

The weekend commitments of DE Sterling Bailey and WR Justin Scott-Wesley gives Georgia nine commitments for the 2011 class. Bailey is one of the state’s top prospects at that key OLB position that’s so important in the 3-4 defense. The 6’5″ Bailey chose Georgia over offers from pretty much everyone in the southeast. Scott-Wesley chose Georgia after backing out of a hasty early commitment to Stanford.

Georgia never gave up on recruiting Scott-Wesley, but they might have an unlikely ally to thank for helping him reconsider his commitment:

“I got the offer from Georgia Tech, and I realized that my decision was made a little too early. I spoke to my coach about it, and we agreed there was more I needed to see before ending the recruiting process,” said Scott.

Scott-Wesley is known first as a track star, and he lived up to expectations this weekend with a state record in the 100 meter and a state title in the 200. Marc Weiszer puts Justin’s track accomplishments into perspective. Florida’s Jeff Demps is still the gold standard, but when you’re comparing track times with guys like Chris Rainey and Branden Smith, it’s a given that Justin Scott-Wesley is going to be one of the fastest players in the SEC when he sets foot on campus next year.

Of course track guys aren’t guaranteed to be successful at football – there’s more to it than speed. Also fast track guys can lose a step as they add on the muscle required to take the physical pounding of SEC football. One thing that could make Wesley-Scott a little different is that he’s already pretty big. Rainey (5’9″, 175 lbs) and Demps (5’8″, 183 lbs) are typical of the size of players in this elite group. LSU speedster Trindon Holliday played at 5’5″ and 160 lbs, and Branden Smith is 5’11”, 170 lbs. Wesley-Scott is already 6’1″ and over 210 lbs as a high school junior. He’s already at a pretty good size to play receiver in the SEC, and the combination of absolute speed and relative size should make him more than just the typical deep threat or designated end-around guy.

7 Responses to 'Georgia’s entry into the Formula 1 division of the SEC'

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  • I’m still perplexed about why Scott-Wesley’s offer list from elite teams is so thin. He’s an outstanding student, lightning fast, with great height & weight. I don’t get it, but thrilled he wants to be a Bulldawg!! If and when Bama & Flarduh come calling i hope he remains solid.

  • The guy clearly has the speed, but will he be a successful receiver? There have been great sprinters in the past who couldn’t run routes or catch the ball consistently. His size doesn’t seem to be an issue, and you would think he’s a pretty strong kid based on his weight, but I’ll reserve my judgment of this young man ’til I see him perform against college players.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m excited about him coming to UGA and glad he’s committed. Hopefully he’s feeling comfortable with the coaches and current players and follows through with a signed LOI, not just a verbal.

  • S FL Chapter of the Bulldog Nation

    May 17th, 2010
    4:06 pm

     

    looks like you got the media guide stats with 6’1″ 210 lbs….ESPN has him listed at 5’11” 190 lbs. Regardless he’s a burner… and I for one am glad he wants to be a Bulldog! Lets keep this 2011 train rollin! Keep ’em commin baby! How Bout Them Dawgs!!!!

  • […] dawgs online sizes up Justin Scott-Wesley: One thing that could make Wesley-Scott a little different is that he's already pretty big. Rainey (5'9», 175 lbs) and Demps (5'8», 183 lbs) are typical of the size of players in this elite group. LSU speedster Trindon Holliday played at 5'5» and 160 lbs, and Branden Smith is 5'11», 170 lbs. Wesley-Scott is already 6'1» and over 210 lbs as a high school junior. He's already at a pretty good size to play receiver in the SEC, and the combination of absolute speed and relative size should make him more than just the typical deep threat or designated end-around guy. […]

  • The 210 lbs. comes from his most recent update from the state track meet…I’m not sure how old that ESPN info is. He was even joking that “I’m going to need to lose some weight.”

    I agree it’s a little strange seeing his offer sheet when you have a guy with this size and speed and over 40 catches last year. Offers from GT and SC mitigate that, and almost all of his updates mention strong interest from Alabama (even as a cornerback). Also maybe hurting him a little was the program he plays for – his coach Dondrial Pinkins was the last major prospect out of that school, and that was 10 years ago. Players from programs like that often need the summer camps for exposure, and we’re not to that point yet – it’s to his credit that he was getting attention last year as a sophomore based on track results. Georgia had a bit of a head start getting a look at him during the 7-on-7 camp in 2009, and we were his first offer.

  • Thanks for the updates Groo. I had no idea ab his school-makes perfect sense. Thankful we got him early! I really like both these guys. May every weekend this summer break bring us ONLY great news like this 😉

    Btw, did you see Bruce Feldman’s tweet this morning ab Star Jackson transferring from Bama? I miss Mett & hate like hell he’s gone, but i’d take elite 11 Star Jackson in his stead. I know it won’t happen; He’ll likely transfer to a D2, but you never know…

    Plus i still think Mett ends up at Tennessee.

  • […] dawgs online sizes up Justin Scott-Wesley: One thing that could make Wesley-Scott a little different is that he's already pretty big. Rainey (5'9», 175 lbs) and Demps (5'8», 183 lbs) are typical of the size of players in this elite group. LSU speedster Trindon Holliday played at 5'5» and 160 lbs, and Branden Smith is 5'11», 170 lbs. Wesley-Scott is already 6'1» and over 210 lbs as a high school junior. He's already at a pretty good size to play receiver in the SEC, and the combination of absolute speed and relative size should make him more than just the typical deep threat or designated end-around guy. […]